Moral confusion?

I’m not so certain that moral confusion reigns in the west, what we’ve seen over the last few weeks in Brazil and Turkey is that in “establishing” democracies middle class people take to the street in ‘occupy’ type demonstrations that are massive and aim to implement what cannot be changed through the ballot box.

The way such demands are to be met are strikingly similar: legal equality, minority rights and and independent judiciary that monitors abuses and corruption. Freedom of religion, speech, press, assembly, and petition are to be granted.

Democracy hasn’t failed these people, it is democracy that often got them to have greater aspirations; the people who took to the streets in Brazil, Turkey and now Egypt don’t want less democracy; they want far more than their leaders may be willing to grant.

Morsi was a continuation of the ancient regime under another flag; nothing had changed and worse than that, basic freedoms that Tahrir veterans fought for were under threat far worse even than under Mubarak. Persecution of women and minorities was increasing and often went unpunished.

The generals of Egypt aren’t going to touch the wheels of government themselves; the half time of the next president and administration will be short as well, the underlying causes of discontent have only been exacerbated by the Morsi presidency. The Egyptian military can only remain aloft by staying lofty.

http://blogs.ft.com/the-world/2013/07/when-is-a-coup-not-a-coup/